Tag Archives: nonprofit organization

Convio Co-Founder Vinay Bhagat Named Business Person of the Year

Vinay Ghagat, Founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Convio, was named 2010 Business Person of the Year by IndUS Business Journal. Ghagat became a leader in Internet fundraising in 1999, when he decided to make the transition into the nonprofit sector, believing he could help nonprofits leverage better fundraising campaigns through the Internet.

Ghagat co-founded Convio, a company that works with nonprofits to assist in fundraising efforts and advocate for change more effectively. The company also works to build stronger relationships with donors, activists, volunteers, alumni and other nonprofit constituents. They have become a leader in the nonprofit sector and continue to pave the way for some really innovative nonprofit campaign strategies. Martin Desmarais, Editor from the IndUS Business Journal said this about the Business Person of the Year:

Vinay’s vision has led Convio to deliver one of the most successful online fundraising and advocacy platforms in the sector. It has not only helped over a thousand nonprofit organizations to raise billions of dollars, but also has provided lasting careers for employees and made a positive impact on the communities they serve.

This is not the first award for the marketing and advocacy innovator — Fundraising Success Magazine named him Fundraising Professional of the Year in 2006 and he received honorable mention as one of Politics Online top 25 people who are changing the world of internet and politics.

In a recent press release, Bhagat said he was,

“Honored to be recognized by IndUS Business Journal. I remain inspired by the nonprofit professionals, volunteers and advocates who work tirelessly to connect people and causes to improve the world. When we launched Convio we had a vision for how innovation and technology could help organizations build enduring relationships that helped them fulfill their missions. Today nonprofits of all shapes and sizes are using our software and services to reach, inspire and move people, and we have built a lasting company dedicated to the success of our clients.”

The award comes at a time when nonprofits are seeing a noticeable decrease in donor funding and a rising fear amongst organization sustainability. Many nonprofits are beginning to look to for-profit companies to help leverage campaigns to raise money, as well as increase their online presence. Organizations that integrate Internet marketing and ‘doing-good’ seem like a long-term solution for organizations struggling to stay afloat amidst the current economic climate.

Learn how Convio’s strategies could help your nonprofit.

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Is Institutional Philanthropy Structured to Support Successful Social Change?

Philanthropy411, in partnership with the National Network of Consultants to Grantmakers, is currently covering the Council on Foundations conference with the help of a blog team. This is a guest post by Lee Draper, Chair of the National Network of Consultants to Grantmakers and CEO of the Draper Consulting Group.

By:  Lee Draper

A few of the Philanthropy 411 bloggers have offered reactions to the Council on Foundations Mini-Plenary, “Social Justice: From Here to 2030”.  I’d like to add another vantage point on the ideas presented.  The panel was composed of some of the most experienced and effective social change leaders from diverse countries and conflicts, moderated by Gara LaMarche of The Atlantic Philanthropies:

  • Akwasi Aidoo, Executive Director of TrustAfrica
  • Deepak Bhargava, Executive Director of the Center for Community Change.
  • Ana Paula Hernandez, Consultant, Angelica Foundation
  • Van Jones, Founder of Green for All
  • Avila Kilmurray, Director of the Community Foundation for Northern Ireland
  • Kumaran Naidoo, International Executive Director of Greenpeace
  • Eboo Patel, Founder and Executive Director of Interfaith Youth Core
  • Connie Rice, Co-Director of the Advancement Project – Los Angeles

First, a definition offered by the panel.  Although social change may ultimately strive to achieve equal opportunity and justice for all, it has additional components:

  • There must be a moral commitment and focus on the marginalized (by poverty, ethnicity, religion, etc.)
  • It involves organizing and empowerment, not amelioration (here is where Paul Connolly commented in his blog entry about this panel that change and charity are important to the equation).
  • It addresses structural changes for lasting impact.

Now, to the core of the quandary.  The panel questioned whether philanthropy had the capacity to support social change due to embedded structural and behavioral impediments.  Their verdict is that if individual grantmakers truly want to achieve social change, they must begin by changing themselves from the inside out, comprehensively and immediately.

To continue reading, visit Philanthropy411.soci

More Than Three-Quarters of American Say a Nonprofit-Corporate Partnership Makes a Cause Stand Out

Sixty-one percent are actively seeking partnership details before supporting the cause, but only 45 percent think organizations disclose enough information.

BOSTON (March 10, 2010) – More than three-quarters (78%) of Americans believe a partnership between a nonprofit and a company they trust makes a cause stand out, according to the newly released 2010 Cone Nonprofit Marketing Trend Tracker.

When the cause breaks through, consumers are more likely to feel positively about the nonprofit (56%) and actively support it. As a result of nonprofit-corporate partnerships:

·         59% of Americans are more likely to buy a product associated with the partnership;

·         50% are more likely to donate to the nonprofit;

·         49% are more likely to participate in an event for the nonprofit; and

·         41% are more likely to volunteer for the nonprofit.

Other nonprofit marketing elements that help capture consumer attention include having an association with a special event or time period (81%); a memorable color, logo or icon that symbolizes the cause or issue (79%) and the involvement of a celebrity or other notable spokesperson (61%).

“Leading nonprofits are transforming their missions into breakthrough cause brands by harnessing the power of corporate partnerships to rally new supporters with a compelling call-to-action,” explains Alison DaSilva, Cone’s executive vice president of Cause Branding. “While we have seen many companies reap the benefits of cause-related partnerships, these results reveal the same benefits hold true for the nonprofit brand. Strategic corporate partnerships can help nonprofits stand out and create new, loyal ambassadors.”

Give Consumers Details

American consumers are highly attuned to nonprofit-corporate partnerships in the marketplace today. Nearly two-thirds (61%) are actively seeking partnership details before deciding to advocate for or donate to the cause. And they want to see results – 75 percent want to hear about the results of partnerships, including the effect on the social issue or money raised for the cause. In light of this penchant for detail, fewer than half (45%) think nonprofits and companies disclose enough information about their partnerships.

Don’t Ignore Traditional Channels

New media have emerged as powerful channels to reach and engage consumers around social and environmental issues and causes, but the Trend Tracker results reveal conventional channels, such as traditional media, advertising and events, still resonate. Americans indicate the following are effective ways for nonprofit organizations to reach them with a message or call-to-action:

·         81% by word-of-mouth from family or friends

·         80% through traditional media (e.g., newspapers, magazines, television)

·         74% in advertising

·         69% at events

·         66% in the store, on a package or at the register

·         64% through standard mail

·         59% through e-mail

·         49% through social media channels (e.g., Facebook, blogs, YouTube, Twitter)

·         29% on mobile devices (via text messaging)

About the survey:

The 2010 Cone Nonprofit Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted February 11-12, 2010 by Opinion Research Corporation among a representative U.S. sample of 1,055 adults comprising 510 men and 545 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3%.

About Cone:

Cone (www.coneince.com) is a strategy and communications agency engaged in building brand trust. Cone creates stakeholder loyalty and long-term relationships through the development and execution of Cause Branding, Brand Marketing, Nonprofit Marketing, Corporate Responsibility and Crisis Prevention and Management initiatives. Cone is a part of the Omnicom Group (NYSE: OMC) (www.omnicomgroup.com).

Keep Your Nonprofit Safe From Spam Mail

This article is brought to you by the team at WildApricot.com.

Does your nonprofit send out e-newsletters, fundraising appeals by email, and/or group “email blasts” to your mailing list? And do those messages sometimes get refused or marked as spam? If so, that’s a problem – for your messaging and for your organization’s reputation – but fortunately it’s a problem you can do something to fix.

Here are a few good resources to help you keep your emails out of the spam filters, and improve your organization’s email deliverability rate:

Mailermailer’s Checklist for Email List Managers suggests 7 easy ways to reduce the chance of spam complaints from your email contacts, protect your organization’s reputation, and make sure those email messages keep getting through to your supporters. You’ll want to read the original article for detailed explanations, of course, but here are the highlights:

To continue reading highlights from the original Checklist for Email List Managers, click here.

Guidestar Launches A Nonprofit Rating Platform

By Heidi Genrich

Guidestar, the mega-database of nonprofits and their Form 990s, has launched a site that gathers and organizes nonprofit reviews from GiveWell, GreatNonprofits, Philanthropedia and Root Cause. Most of Guidestar’s parnter sites are all charity evaluators that survey charity experts, though GreatNonprofits utilizes user-submitted reviews. Up until this point, Guidstar has only been primarily useful to those who need know more about a specific nonprofit, but their new platform, , is aimed at directing users to quality nonprofits within various cause categories.

This development is also interesting in light of the joint  press release put out by GuideStarCharity NavigatorGiveWellPhilanthropediaGreatNonprofits and Philanthropy Action last year that condemned the use of overhead ratios (i.e. how much was spent on programs vs. administration vs. fundraising) and finances to rate and compare nonprofit organizations. There has been a positive shift in the community towards prioritizing the nonprofit’s social impact when judging their programs and operations.

CEO Pay: Should Expensive Executives Get Out Of Nonprofit?

By Heidi Genrich

In her article Nonprofit CEOs Who Want For-Profit Salaries Should Work at For-Profit Companies, Rosetta Thurman argues that there is an important difference between high pay and excessive pay, challenging the growing consensus that nonprofits should pay executive salaries competitive with their for-profit counterparts. Thurman divides her argument into several important points, but most compellingly she point out that focus on executive pay forgets the other important part of a nonprofit organization: everyone else who works in a nonprofit organization.

Now if we defended increasing the salaries of other nonprofit staff members as much as we do for CEO’s, the sector would be in much better shape. I know that while many CEO’s get paid extremely well, their staff members still make pennies on the dollar. No matter how great they are, no successful nonprofit CEO raises millions singlehandedly.

Nonprofit professionals, the people who do the grunt work of raising money and implementing programs, are infamously underpaid. It is also a little hard to swallow seven figure executive salaries while nonprofits cut back on services. Check out Rosetta Thurman’s full article from The Chronicle Of Philanthropy and let us know what you think!

Are Charities Becoming Obsolete?

Posted 2/15/10 by Marcia Stepanek on Cause Global

People have been asking for a while now whether there are too many charities—either too many focused on accomplishing the same things, or too few able to prove social impact.

But now, as the nonprofit charity sector enters its third year of steep declines in donor dollars, a new question is dominating the conversation: are traditional, middleman charities—whose purpose has been to raise money for various causes and spend it as their boards see fit—becoming obsolete?

To be sure, Establishment charities aren’t just struggling for new dollars in this recession. They’re also scrambling to regain credibility amid years of chronic waste, fraud and abuse dogging the sector. Traditional charities also are being pushed hard, to reinvent themselves amid new competition from Web-spurred advocacy networks and the rise of new “sector-agnostic” mass activism initiatives, including new social enterprises. For some time now, philanthropy thought leaders have predicted that unless traditional charities fundamentally reinvent themselves as aggregators and issues experts—and retool their funding models—they could die trying.

Read the rest on Cause Global.