Category Archives: Social Media

Are Online Donation Sites Destined to Become the Next eBay?

Posted on August 10, 2010 at Social Edge.

Lucy Bernholz (Blueprint Research & Design), Edward Skloot (Stanford School of Public Policy, Duke University) and Barry Varela (Duke University) explore the immediate and longer-term implications of networked digital technologies for philanthropy. Their claim: as enormous databases and powerful new visualization tools can be accessed instantly by anyone, at any time, information networks are transforming philanthropy. In this excerpt of “Disrupting Philanthropy: Technology and the Future of the Social Sector,” they offer a glimpse of what is to come.

Read the full post and join the conversation.

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Thrive Offers Nonprofits a Solution for Social Media Management

Small Act, a company dedicated to helping nonprofits, has just announced the arrival of a new tool that will help nonprofits meet organization goals and needs. Called Thrive, the online tool will organize and measure nonprofits specific social media efforts. Incorporating granular scheduling, keyword search capability, contact management with tagging and in-depth reporting, Thrive hopes to be the solution to many nonprofits failing to keep up with social media trends.

According to Grassroots.org, “Thrive manages your social network while attracting supporters and donors to your cause.” They go on to say that, “similar to other tools, you control when you Tweet or update your status on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and YouTube (other networks coming soon), target and engage those who care about your work and receive stats on all accounts.”

Thrive will enable you to send your latest Tweets or Facebooks dates easily and more efficiently, allowing nonprofits to better engage followers. Organize contact lists to pinpoint ‘superfans’ or donors, and keep an eye on who is posting and reading what posts. You can even tag and write notes about contacts based on your interactions with them.

As nonprofits look increasingly to social networking to raise funds and following, Thrive could offer a tangible solution to help keep up with the world of social media.

Get your free trial of Thrive and start making an impact through social media.

Convio Co-Founder Vinay Bhagat Named Business Person of the Year

Vinay Ghagat, Founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Convio, was named 2010 Business Person of the Year by IndUS Business Journal. Ghagat became a leader in Internet fundraising in 1999, when he decided to make the transition into the nonprofit sector, believing he could help nonprofits leverage better fundraising campaigns through the Internet.

Ghagat co-founded Convio, a company that works with nonprofits to assist in fundraising efforts and advocate for change more effectively. The company also works to build stronger relationships with donors, activists, volunteers, alumni and other nonprofit constituents. They have become a leader in the nonprofit sector and continue to pave the way for some really innovative nonprofit campaign strategies. Martin Desmarais, Editor from the IndUS Business Journal said this about the Business Person of the Year:

Vinay’s vision has led Convio to deliver one of the most successful online fundraising and advocacy platforms in the sector. It has not only helped over a thousand nonprofit organizations to raise billions of dollars, but also has provided lasting careers for employees and made a positive impact on the communities they serve.

This is not the first award for the marketing and advocacy innovator — Fundraising Success Magazine named him Fundraising Professional of the Year in 2006 and he received honorable mention as one of Politics Online top 25 people who are changing the world of internet and politics.

In a recent press release, Bhagat said he was,

“Honored to be recognized by IndUS Business Journal. I remain inspired by the nonprofit professionals, volunteers and advocates who work tirelessly to connect people and causes to improve the world. When we launched Convio we had a vision for how innovation and technology could help organizations build enduring relationships that helped them fulfill their missions. Today nonprofits of all shapes and sizes are using our software and services to reach, inspire and move people, and we have built a lasting company dedicated to the success of our clients.”

The award comes at a time when nonprofits are seeing a noticeable decrease in donor funding and a rising fear amongst organization sustainability. Many nonprofits are beginning to look to for-profit companies to help leverage campaigns to raise money, as well as increase their online presence. Organizations that integrate Internet marketing and ‘doing-good’ seem like a long-term solution for organizations struggling to stay afloat amidst the current economic climate.

Learn how Convio’s strategies could help your nonprofit.

Beth Kanter’s 10 Ways Geolocation Is Changing The World

Beth Kanter is the author of Beth’s Blog and the forthcoming book The Networked Nonprofit, CEO of Zoetica, and curator of NTEN’s “We Are Media” Nonprofit Social Media Starter Kit.” Best known for her prominence in the nonprofit world, Kanter was name one of the most influential women in technology by Fast Company Magazine, and one of Business Week’s “Voices of Innovation for Social Media.”

This week in Beth’s Blog, she takes a more detailed look at how location technologies are transforming the way we experience, navigate, and ultimately better our world.

Read more from Beth’s Blog.

Allison Fine and Beth Kanter: Connecting With Social Media

Okay, so if you are living under a nonprofit rock — first of all I’m sorry, because it must be gross — and second of all you should get out. For all of you nonprofits who want to break out from under that rock, this is a great way to start.

Last week I tuned in to a live webinar on how to Build a Networked Nonprofit Group, hosted by authors and nonprofit guru’s Beth Kanter and Allison Fine. These lovely ladies, as The Chronicle bests puts it,

“write about the ways even the most time-pressed nonprofit groups can harness social-media tools to expand their network of donors and volunteers, adocate for their cause, and win attention.”

With their new book just released this June, The Networked Nonprofit: Connecting With Social Media to Drive Change, Kanter and Fine present the most up to date and relevant information your nonprofit could need. The book covers all the basics; Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, wikis, blogs, contests, map, widgets etc. in a simple and clear cut manner. You do not need to be an internet techie to get something out of this book. It’s relevant and include great examples of how nonprofit organizations — both big and small — have used these tools to be help leverage their success.

If you or someone in your nonprofit doesn’t have time to sit down and read the book (which you should do, really it’s one book that will benefit your organization in the long run), then check out this webinar online. Beth and Allison have given tons of links and feeds to informational sites. After reading through their Twitter Tip Sheet, you’ll know what I’m taking about.

If anything, you will feel confident knowing that you are not the only nonprofit out there that at times may feel utterly challenged by technology overload. Because, let’s face it, there are so many tools out there that it can really be overwhelming. The trick is to find one media that is right for you and your nonprofit, then utilize this to it’s full potential.

Should You Not Donate by Text Message?

Posted by Ginny Mies,

PC World, June 2, 2010.

We all have our excuses for not donating to disaster relief funds or to our favorite charities: We’re broke, the donation process is too complicated, we lack the time to write and send a check, and so on. Mobile donating–giving money to an organization via text message–makes giving a little easier. But is it safe? And does it have a significant impact on the charity or the people in need?

Donating by cell phone is incredibly quick and easy: You just text a word (like ?HAITI’) or a number to a specific phone number, and a set amount is charged to your phone bill. Your carrier then delivers the funds to the charity. The mobile donation approach has been around for a couple of years, but it didn’t really catch on until the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The American Red Cross’s Haiti Relief and Development Fund, the most successful mobile campaign to date, raised more than $32 million within a month after the disaster.

Advocates say that mobile donations are an appealing option because they’re convenient and offer instant gratification. The system also opens up philanthropy to individuals who might otherwise feel that they couldn’t contribute. Younger audiences, for instance, appreciate being able to donate via text message because they don’t need a credit card to do so.

Click here to read more on how to find a legitimate charity worth donating via text messaging.

More Than Three-Quarters of American Say a Nonprofit-Corporate Partnership Makes a Cause Stand Out

Sixty-one percent are actively seeking partnership details before supporting the cause, but only 45 percent think organizations disclose enough information.

BOSTON (March 10, 2010) – More than three-quarters (78%) of Americans believe a partnership between a nonprofit and a company they trust makes a cause stand out, according to the newly released 2010 Cone Nonprofit Marketing Trend Tracker.

When the cause breaks through, consumers are more likely to feel positively about the nonprofit (56%) and actively support it. As a result of nonprofit-corporate partnerships:

·         59% of Americans are more likely to buy a product associated with the partnership;

·         50% are more likely to donate to the nonprofit;

·         49% are more likely to participate in an event for the nonprofit; and

·         41% are more likely to volunteer for the nonprofit.

Other nonprofit marketing elements that help capture consumer attention include having an association with a special event or time period (81%); a memorable color, logo or icon that symbolizes the cause or issue (79%) and the involvement of a celebrity or other notable spokesperson (61%).

“Leading nonprofits are transforming their missions into breakthrough cause brands by harnessing the power of corporate partnerships to rally new supporters with a compelling call-to-action,” explains Alison DaSilva, Cone’s executive vice president of Cause Branding. “While we have seen many companies reap the benefits of cause-related partnerships, these results reveal the same benefits hold true for the nonprofit brand. Strategic corporate partnerships can help nonprofits stand out and create new, loyal ambassadors.”

Give Consumers Details

American consumers are highly attuned to nonprofit-corporate partnerships in the marketplace today. Nearly two-thirds (61%) are actively seeking partnership details before deciding to advocate for or donate to the cause. And they want to see results – 75 percent want to hear about the results of partnerships, including the effect on the social issue or money raised for the cause. In light of this penchant for detail, fewer than half (45%) think nonprofits and companies disclose enough information about their partnerships.

Don’t Ignore Traditional Channels

New media have emerged as powerful channels to reach and engage consumers around social and environmental issues and causes, but the Trend Tracker results reveal conventional channels, such as traditional media, advertising and events, still resonate. Americans indicate the following are effective ways for nonprofit organizations to reach them with a message or call-to-action:

·         81% by word-of-mouth from family or friends

·         80% through traditional media (e.g., newspapers, magazines, television)

·         74% in advertising

·         69% at events

·         66% in the store, on a package or at the register

·         64% through standard mail

·         59% through e-mail

·         49% through social media channels (e.g., Facebook, blogs, YouTube, Twitter)

·         29% on mobile devices (via text messaging)

About the survey:

The 2010 Cone Nonprofit Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted February 11-12, 2010 by Opinion Research Corporation among a representative U.S. sample of 1,055 adults comprising 510 men and 545 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3%.

About Cone:

Cone (www.coneince.com) is a strategy and communications agency engaged in building brand trust. Cone creates stakeholder loyalty and long-term relationships through the development and execution of Cause Branding, Brand Marketing, Nonprofit Marketing, Corporate Responsibility and Crisis Prevention and Management initiatives. Cone is a part of the Omnicom Group (NYSE: OMC) (www.omnicomgroup.com).